Disrupting Death

July 14, 2022 from 10:45 am to 12:00 pm

Room Number: TRS 1-073

Join the Meeting: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/98885419498?pwd=Nk9LZ2hRa1JoQmVUcktiVlcyREJQdz09

Chair: Doris Hambuch (United Arab Emirates U)

Speakers:

Karen Sanderson Cole (U West Indies, St. Augustine), “Publicly Private: Negotiating the Personal through Narrative Rupture in Glynne Manley: Truth Be Told: Michael Manley in Conversation”

Debamitra Kar (Women’s College, Calcutta), “Creating the Spectacle of Death: Democracy and its Ruptures”

Sylvia Terzian (St. Jerome’s University), “Radical Rethinking of Ars Moriendi in Rawi Hage’s Beirut Hellfire Society

Paper Summaries:

Karen Sanderson Cole (U West Indies, St. Augustine), “Publicly Private: Negotiating the Personal through Narrative Rupture in Glynne Manley: Truth Be Told: Michael Manley in Conversation”

“Publicly Private: Negotiating the Personal through Narrative Rupture in Glynne Manley: Truth Be Told: Michael Manley in Conversation” examines the auto/biographical memoir of Michael Manley as told through interviews. Of interest are the narrative strategies suggestive of opportunities within rupture for spiritual growth and healing even in the face of certain death.

Debamitra Kar (Women’s College, Calcutta), “Creating the Spectacle of Death: Democracy and its Ruptures”

Genocidal violence seen as ruptures in democracy is arguably a systemic means of consolidating state power. It is an expression of the law outside law that originates from the experience of colonization, and is used to subordinate the minority community. The paper studies the cases of Nelli massacre and Godhra riots through primary texts of documentary and memoir.

Sylvia Terzian (St. Jerome’s University), “Radical Rethinking of Ars Moriendi in Rawi Hage’s Beirut Hellfire Society

In his novel, Beirut Hellfire Society, Rawi Hage explores the concept of a ‘good death’. Hage disrupts prevailing assumptions about life’s proper end—about who should die, when and where, and under what circumstances, and, in doing so, forces a radical rethinking of death.