Gendered Violence

July 14, 2022 from 10:45 am to 12:00 pm

Room Number: TRS 2-164

Join the Meeting: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/98651640981?pwd=RWs5SjhnbjJLLy9xZU9tdG40N1Q3dz09

Chair: Sarah Olutola (Lakehead U)

Speakers:

Maab Alkurdi (U Waterloo), “Lucy’s Oppression Conveyed”

Onaopemipo Fayose (North-west U), “Apartheid and the Politics of Identity in selected South African Narratives” 

Tehmina Pirzada (Texas A & M Qatar), “Girlhood and Narrative Ethics in Home Fire and Girl

Paper Summaries:

Maab Alkurdi (U Waterloo), “Lucy’s Oppression Conveyed”

With attention to a close reading of the text, I show how Bettina Judd’s “The Inauguration of Experiments: December 1845” (Judd 19) reveals a horrifying practice during the slavery era in America, namely, medical experiments conducted on enslaved female bodies without anesthesia. The poem describes Lucy’s encounter of such violence.

Onaopemipo Fayose (North-west U), “Apartheid and the Politics of Identity in selected South African Narratives”

In South Africa, identity is still a contentious topic, and the spectre of rape looms large, especially from women’s precarity. Rape and racism are common occurrences and societal ills that require a more nuanced examination to find the rainbow nation’s identity difficulties.

Tehmina Pirzada (Texas A & M Qatar), “Girlhood and Narrative Ethics in Home Fire and Girl

This paper examines the novels Home Fire and Girl through a focus on narrative ethics and girlhood, explicating how the girl protagonists reimagine coming-of-age in a world ruptured by horrific acts of violence committed in the name of state and religion, forcing the girls to use their language as a tactic for survival.