Classrooms and Curricula

July 14, 2022 from 1:00 pm to 2:15 pm

Room Number: TRS 1-077

Join the Meeting: https://ryerson.zoom.us/j/94892217964?pwd=algzZFdPRi9PUnYwaktES281cVRCUT09

Chair: Terri Tomsky (U Alberta)

Speakers:

Chandrima Chakraborty (McMaster U), “Remembering as Rupture: South Asian Diasporic Literature in a Canadian Classroom”

Michael Chapman (Durban UT), “#RhodesMustFall: On Literary Attachment and the Rupturing Event”

Jyotishman Kalita (IIT Mandi), “Reclaiming the Commons Through Folklore: An Ecocritical Illustration from Communities of North East India”

Paper Summaries:

Chandrima Chakraborty (McMaster U), “Remembering as Rupture: South Asian Diasporic Literature in a Canadian Classroom”

Remembrance pedagogy can create openings for conversations on legacies of the 1985 Air India bombings that are being erased by official forms of remembering in Canada. Teaching South Asian history through the lens of a “Canadian tragedy” that resonates with few, helps to historicize the presence of racialized students in the classroom.

Michael Chapman (Durban UT), “#RhodesMustFall: On Literary Attachment and the Rupturing Event”

In South Africa, the year 2015 witnessed the rupturing event of #RhodesMustFall. My purpose is not, as it might be in Critique, to position literature in illustration of a state of the nation event; rather, it is to reflect on how literary thinking or imagining may respond to such a rupturing event.

Jyotishman Kalita (IIT Mandi), “Reclaiming the Commons Through Folklore: An Ecocritical Illustration from Communities of North East India”

This paper suggests a way of reclaiming the commons through an ecocritical study of folklore; and for that purpose, provides an analysis of the representation of commons in the folklore of communities from North East India. The analysis provides four possible positions of alternative perspectives to commons and interventions thereof.